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PostPosted: Fri Jun 13, 2008 4:54 pm 
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50cc Lane Splitter

Joined: Thu Sep 06, 2007 11:07 am
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These are tips I picked up when I was a bicyclist, but a lot of them apply to scootering as well. I only post because I've had a few close calls lately, and it seems like our numbers are rising nowadays (between the fuel prices and warm weather). All of these are extrapolations of the "assume you are invisible" mantra:

1. Keep an eye out for the pedestrian down the street hailing a taxi. Once you see him, do a quick look-around to spot any cabs that will attempt to pick him up. Be particularly wary if your street is otherwise quiet, since cabs are then more likely to cut across lanes (and your skull) to get the fare.

2. When riding close to parked cars or a stopped taxi, look through the back windshield to spot the passenger attempting to exit to the street side. Nobody wants to get doored.

3. When riding past stopped traffic, pedestrians will not look both ways before crossing in front of you. Pedestrians see stopped cars and assume it's safe to cross the street willy-nilly, forgetting about bicyclists and scooterists that may be riding through/around the stopped traffic. While more relevant on side streets, it's just as true on the larger avenues during rush hour. Be especially wary when you're passing a stopped bus/truck, since you and the pedestrian won't see or hear each other coming. And in case a pedestrian does walk in your way, before you go apeshit, remember that you are just as much at fault as the pedestrian (you're not supposed to split lanes).

4. If, for some reason, you decide to ride on the edges of traffic (where bicycles normally go), be extra careful at intersections that turn towards you (i.e. the street allows a right turn, and you're riding in the right-side gutter). Assume the turning car won't see you, and either go around (to the left, in the above example), or wait until a clear moment before proceeding through the intersection. Going through the intersection alongside a car is just too damn dangerous. Generally speaking I just don't ride in those areas because there are too many risks. I've seen too many near-misses and even falls because of exactly this situation.


That's all I can think of for now.

Ride safely.

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PostPosted: Fri Jul 04, 2008 3:58 am 
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Joined: Fri Jul 04, 2008 3:32 am
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Scooter Model(s): SYM HD EVO125
As a fellow scooter rider myself, here is my suggestion:
Get a raincoat, nice and wind-proof jacket, a good helmet better with a visor, and warm muffs. These are precautions and protections you need to do because you have to expose yourself utterly when riding a scooter, especially when it rains and gets chill. Also, you may not want to ride in between cars through traffic, because that makes you look like you want to race with the cars (trouble comes when you accentially scratches the cars with your back mirrors!), and cause danger to pedestrians. A good benefit for riding a scooter is that, the spare parts are way much cheaper than those of cars!

--------------------------------------------------------------My spare parts world: http://www.teamworld.com.tw


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PostPosted: Sun Jul 20, 2008 10:53 pm 
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4000cc Scooter Titan
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Location: Brooklyn Heights-Carroll Gardens corridor...
Scooter Model(s): 07 GTS
Good advice...
chimera wrote:
Get a raincoat, nice and wind-proof jacket, a good helmet better with a visor, and warm muffs. These are precautions and protections you need to do because you have to expose yourself utterly when riding a scooter, especially when it rains and gets chill.


but...... spam?....
chimera wrote:
A good benefit for riding a scooter is that, the spare parts are way much cheaper than those of cars!

--------------------------------------------------------------My spare parts world: http://www.teamworld.com.tw

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PostPosted: Mon Jul 21, 2008 10:47 am 
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2000cc Scooter Royalty

Joined: Thu Apr 10, 2008 2:54 pm
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Location: Jersey City, NJ
Scooter Model(s): 2009 Aprilia Scarabeo 200
Wear Gloves.

Unles you're in a wide open grassy field, don't enjoy it too much. Pay attention to what's in front, to the side and behind you. Take it for granted for a moment, and it could get ugly. I know.


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PostPosted: Wed Aug 20, 2008 8:22 am 
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Location: uws
Scooter Model(s): et4 and px150
From RoadRunner Magazine:

Quote:
Commuters on Two Wheels

Do you know someone--with no prior riding experience--who recently bought a motorcycle or scooter so they can save fuel and money commuting to work? If so, then chances are that person could benefit from some safe riding advice from you. To that end, you may find helpful the following ten street survival strategies for motorcycle commuters:

1. Avoid High Risk Roads: Try to avoid routes to and from work with high risk factors, such as those with ongoing construction, numerous places for traffic ingress and egress, frequent animal presence, etc.

2. Be Seen: Wear bright colors and use auxiliary driving lights to increase your visibility to other drivers and riders. Follow the left or driver’s side tire track of cars in front so they will be able to see you from two of their rear view mirrors. Have reflectors on your bike and your riding gear for any night riding.

3. Dress the Part: Riders always should wear a full-face helmet, leather gloves, a riding jacket with armor and footwear that covers the ankles. Carry raingear and warm clothing for inclement weather.

4. Identify Yourself: Carry medical alert information that includes who to contact in the event of an accident, your name, blood type, drug allergies, etc.

5. Continue Improving Your Safe Riding Skills: Take as many riding classes as your time and budget allow. Also, gain experience by talking to and riding with more experienced riders and read some of the numerous books published about riding skills.

6. Carry Emergency Items: Tire repair kits, cell phones and first aid kits are good things to have on your commute.

7. Ride Alert: Never ride under the influence of alcohol or any other controlled substance or when you’re significantly fatigued or emotionally distraught. Riders need their full concentration on their surroundings and shouldn’t be listening to music through earplugs or engaging in any other potentially distracting activity.

8. Anticipate: Observe what is happening at least 8 seconds ahead of your current position to anticipate potential dangers. Watch for head movements of drivers at intersections or any other indication that they may not see you and are likely pull out in front of you. Allow at least three seconds of space between you and the car in front of you and never share a lane with another moving vehicle.

9. Pack Securely: Carry your briefcase and any other items in a courier bag, tail bag, saddle bag or otherwise firmly attached to the bike in a secure fashion.

10. Inspect Your Bike before Riding It: Check for proper tire pressure and remaining tire tread life, fluid levels, functioning lights and other critical bike functions before riding it.

A more extensive article on motorcycle commuting can be found on our website ( http://www.roadrunner.travel/article-5937.php ).

And most of all...

Quote:
Beware of left-turning vehicles, because they account for about half of all motorcycle and car accidents!

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 Post subject: msf + safety videos
PostPosted: Sun Jan 04, 2009 2:36 am 
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4000cc Scooter Titan

Joined: Sun May 14, 2006 4:12 pm
Posts: 4916
Location: dabronx
Scooter Model(s): 2006 LX190 DRAGON RED SCOOTER
these vids may be helpful if you are considering getting a scooter ;) :idea:

a common road we all drive
[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9czuXt3VWwc[/youtube]
helmets
[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bHmRebeHvFo[/youtube]
group riding
[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=erpkyD7SMfw[/youtube]
intersections
[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3O6bjz_SP_I[/youtube]
msf course highlights
[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=prR20YZtPGU[/youtube]

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 Post subject: Re: msf + safety videos
PostPosted: Sun Jan 04, 2009 3:21 am 
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4000cc Scooter Titan

Joined: Sun May 14, 2006 4:12 pm
Posts: 4916
Location: dabronx
Scooter Model(s): 2006 LX190 DRAGON RED SCOOTER
being safe isn't a part time job..
[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z-SxHxW5xcQ[/youtube]

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PostPosted: Fri Feb 27, 2009 5:56 pm 
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50cc Lane Splitter
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Posts: 53
Location: Caldwell, NJ
Scooter Model(s): Aprilia Mana 850
A few more:

Set a progressive series of riding goals: parking lot; then local streets; then bigger streets; then longer trips; then city trips; then highways; then bridge grates or grooved asphalt; then rain-riding; then night-riding, and so forth. Address your fears and conquer them one-by-one. Don't be in a hurry, but don't slack off or chicken out, either.

Buy scooter luggage -- top case, tunnel bag, side panniers, or some combination -- and pack it with emergency gear and supplies. You want to be prepared for unexpected changes in weather: rain, cold, heat, etc. You also want to be prepared if day turns to night (clear glasses), or you get a bee bite (Benedryl), or go down and get road rash (gauze, tape and disinfectant), or if you need to read a map at night (flashlight), or your rear-view mirror gets side-swiped (duct tape), or whatever else you can possibly anticipate. Knowing you're fully prepared will give you a feeling of confidence and help make sure that a minor inconvenience doesn't turn into a major nightmare.

Always bring a fully-charged cell phone and extra cash. Always use ear plugs. Remember to apply sunscreen to your nose, even on cloudy days, so you don't spend the summer looking like Rudolph the Reindeer. Always gas up before taking off. Always take sufficient maps. Always let your housemates know of your riding plans. Always take breaks when you get fatigued. Basically, always act like a responsible, forward-thinking adult and live to see the next ride.

Finally, support your local authorized dealer, including doing your regular service check-ups, and purchasing gear and accessories from them wherever possible. Undoubtedly there will come a day when you'll be leaning on them for some kind of support or advice, and you don't want to be "eBaying them" into extinction.


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PostPosted: Fri Jun 24, 2011 12:32 pm 
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1000cc Scooter Legend
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Posts: 1798
Location: SOHO, Manhattan
Scooter Model(s): Suzuki & Honda.
15 Tips for New NYC Riders. Note that some of them apply everywhere we go, not only Manhattan.

There's lots of advice out there for new riders, but we know the NYC-Metro area is a different animal. Here's a list of some city-specific tips from NYMSTF members:

1) Never get between the curb and a taxi without a fare.
2) Practice mentally other drivers' stupidity; they won't disappoint. Always be ready to swerve.
3) Learn parking rules, and keep tickets and towing to a minimum.
4) Take a track day every year; it keeps your maneuvering skills sharp.
5) Get a bike that fits your skill and not your friends' eyes.
6) Toll booths are filthy, slippery, and filled with angry, antsy car drivers. Beware.
7) Safely move ahead of drunks and other rolling road hazards. If you can get around them, you won't be involved in whatever accident they cause.
8 The moment you stop thinking of yourself as a new rider, you'll drop your guard. Don't.
9) Learn to do a tune-up and safety check on your own scooter or motorcycle. Cables, tires, levers, signals, oil, and suspension: none of it is too hard and YouTube has tons of how-to videos.
10) Find a local mechanic and build a relationship there.
11) Support your local parts and gear shop, or you won't have a local shop to go to.
12) Just because city streets are 30mph doesn't mean you shouldn't use ATGATT: All the Gear, All of the Time. Your head, ankles, hands, knees, and elbows will always be vulnerable even in a low-speed get-off. Lots of shops stock fashionable, lightweight mesh gear for summer. Buy some!
13) Beware of wet manhole covers and steel road plates. Slippery stuff!
14) Keep the number of a local tow truck and a spare $100 in your wallet at all times.
15) NYC traffic is not as well controlled as it appears to be. People still run red lights in Manhattan, drive the wrong way down one-way streets, and just because there's a traffic light every 250ft. doesn't mean that you don't need to pay attention. It's ok to let the "other guy" win if it means you get home safe.

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2007 Suzuki Burgman Executive 650 c.c.
1987 Honda Helix 250 c.c.


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PostPosted: Fri Jun 24, 2011 1:55 pm 
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1000cc Scooter Legend
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Joined: Wed Feb 13, 2008 3:23 pm
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Location: NYC & Eastern Sufolk County
Scooter Model(s): 1984 Honda Aero 125 Red, 1982 Honda Urban Express, 1995 Honda Nighthawk 750
Great advice especially buying the bike that fits your skill level.

I've heard it all too often "I need a CBR1000RR, my buddies say I'll get tired of the CBR600RR."
FYI: The 600 will push 130MPH

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PostPosted: Fri Jun 24, 2011 1:56 pm 
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4000cc Scooter Titan
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Joined: Sun Dec 09, 2007 1:06 pm
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Location: Brooklyn Heights-Carroll Gardens corridor...
Scooter Model(s): 07 GTS
Motosport wrote:
...
I've heard it all too often "I need a CBR1000RR, my buddies say I'll get tired of the CBR600RR."
FYI: The 600 will push 130MPH


Next time tell 'em its more fun to drive a slow bike fast than a fast bike slow...

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Porn-Hair wrote:
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PostPosted: Fri Jun 24, 2011 1:57 pm 
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2000cc Scooter Royalty
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Joined: Thu Aug 27, 2009 11:05 am
Posts: 2049
Location: A deluxe UES apt in the sky
Scooter Model(s): 07 GTS, 07 Stella
burgmanite wrote:
15 Tips for New NYC Riders. Note that some of them apply everywhere we go, not only Manhattan.

There's lots of advice out there for new riders, but we know the NYC-Metro area is a different animal. Here's a list of some city-specific tips from NYMSTF members:

1) Never get between the curb and a taxi without a fare.
2) Practice mentally other drivers' stupidity; they won't disappoint. Always be ready to swerve.
3) Learn parking rules, and keep tickets and towing to a minimum.
4) Take a track day every year; it keeps your maneuvering skills sharp.
5) Get a bike that fits your skill and not your friends' eyes.
6) Toll booths are filthy, slippery, and filled with angry, antsy car drivers. Beware.
7) Safely move ahead of drunks and other rolling road hazards. If you can get around them, you won't be involved in whatever accident they cause.
8 The moment you stop thinking of yourself as a new rider, you'll drop your guard. Don't.
9) Learn to do a tune-up and safety check on your own scooter or motorcycle. Cables, tires, levers, signals, oil, and suspension: none of it is too hard and YouTube has tons of how-to videos.
10) Find a local mechanic and build a relationship there.
11) Support your local parts and gear shop, or you won't have a local shop to go to.
12) Just because city streets are 30mph doesn't mean you shouldn't use ATGATT: All the Gear, All of the Time. Your head, ankles, hands, knees, and elbows will always be vulnerable even in a low-speed get-off. Lots of shops stock fashionable, lightweight mesh gear for summer. Buy some!
13) Beware of wet manhole covers and steel road plates. Slippery stuff!
14) Keep the number of a local tow truck and a spare $100 in your wallet at all times.
15) NYC traffic is not as well controlled as it appears to be. People still run red lights in Manhattan, drive the wrong way down one-way streets, and just because there's a traffic light every 250ft. doesn't mean that you don't need to pay attention. It's ok to let the "other guy" win if it means you get home safe.


Nice!


I would add painted lines (crosswalk, etc) to #13.

Track days are rather impractical for most (remove coolant, zip together two piece suit) and likely don't aid urban scooting much. I think #4 would be better suited as find a big parking lot and practice, practice, practice. Panic stops (in a straight line, on broken pavement and when leaned over) and tight maneuvers (circles, 8s).

I found in a couple of panic stops that, being used to having a clutch, I still had the throttle open a wee bit once stopped.

Along the lines of 1 and 2, is one of my favorite jackass moves. People who decide to turn across an entire avenue as traffic thins when the light is near changing. Same for people jumping across avenues to park in that spot and pick up fares.

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PostPosted: Fri Jun 24, 2011 2:05 pm 
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1000cc Scooter Legend

Joined: Fri Jul 17, 2009 4:12 pm
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Scooter Model(s): SYM HD 200
Excellent

But as to #14, Progressive roadside service is something like $8.00 per year.


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PostPosted: Fri Jun 24, 2011 2:43 pm 
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2000cc Scooter Royalty
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Location: A deluxe UES apt in the sky
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Motosport wrote:
Great advice especially buying the bike that fits your skill level.

I've heard it all too often "I need a CBR1000RR, my buddies say I'll get tired of the CBR600RR."
FYI: The 600 will push 130MPH



True, but they are a bit of a dog (relatively, although I haven't ridden a 600 newer than the F4i) off the line, even compared to the VFR.

It's about wanting more once you are able to handle the 600. If you have the restraint to not use more than you can handle, buying a 600 as a "starter bike" is a bit of a waste.

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PostPosted: Fri Jun 24, 2011 3:28 pm 
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2000cc Scooter Royalty

Joined: Thu Apr 10, 2008 2:54 pm
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Location: Jersey City, NJ
Scooter Model(s): 2009 Aprilia Scarabeo 200
To 13 I would add paint on roadways, especially wide letters and arrows, etc. Those things are laminated and like ice.


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PostPosted: Sat Jun 25, 2011 2:09 am 
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150cc Daily Rider

Joined: Sun May 29, 2011 12:28 am
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16. There is no law that says you have to lane share. Don't assume just because "everyone else" is doing it that it's safe. There is absolutely no margin for error when you're in between two lanes of traffic.

17. You can't judge a pothole/bump by it's looks. Some look small, but bounce you off your seat. Some look huge, but end up being smooth. And every single street in NYC is full of them! Always keep a 3 second distance behind the car in front of you so you can swerve in time to miss.


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PostPosted: Sat Jun 25, 2011 6:26 am 
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monkeytine wrote:
16. There is no law that says you have to lane share.

There should be, though. ;) Actually, despite the fact that it's almost as common as jaywalking, I just wish it was legal.

Brendan

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PostPosted: Sat Jun 25, 2011 7:55 am 
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1000cc Scooter Legend
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Scooter Model(s): 1984 Honda Aero 125 Red, 1982 Honda Urban Express, 1995 Honda Nighthawk 750
scosgt wrote:
Excellent

But as to #14, Progressive roadside service is something like $8.00 per year.


$10/year with 24/7 service and you don't have to wait to get reimbursed. It's the best raodside/towing coverage I know.

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PostPosted: Sat Jun 25, 2011 7:56 am 
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1000cc Scooter Legend
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Location: NYC & Eastern Sufolk County
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sallad wrote:
Motosport wrote:
...
I've heard it all too often "I need a CBR1000RR, my buddies say I'll get tired of the CBR600RR."
FYI: The 600 will push 130MPH


Next time tell 'em its more fun to drive a slow bike fast than a fast bike slow...


and watch them walk out the door and down the road to the Suzuki dealer.....can you spell Hyabusa!!!!!!!!!!!

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PostPosted: Sat Jun 25, 2011 11:11 am 
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150cc Daily Rider
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Maybe suggest that they take their 600 to the track before they think they "need" a liter bike? (No, you don't have to do anything to your coolant, and all gear is available for very cheap rental.) Anyone who considers a 600cc sportbike as a "starter" bike has no idea of the potential of that machine.

and for my contribution:

XX. When cutting to the front of traffic, never be on the side where traffic will be turning onto the cross street.


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