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PostPosted: Thu Apr 20, 2006 11:25 am 
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Location: west NEW YORK
Scooter Model(s): Modified, Customized and Sanitized black VESPA ET4
GROUP RIDING "HOW-TO"

"The road is not the place to socialize. If you like to ride with others, do it in a way that promotes safety and doesn't interfere with the flow of traffic.

Steps:
1. Keep the group small - four or five SCOOTS at most. Small groups make it easier and safer for other motorists to get around you if they need to. And a small cluster isn't as easily separated by traffic or red lights, so riders won't always be hurrying to catch up to one another. Divide a large group into two or more smaller groups.

2. Note that the best way to keep close ranks and maintain an adequate space cushion is to ride in a staggered formation.

Image

Ride on the left side of the lane if you're the leader, stay a little behind on the right side if you're next in line. Take the left position two seconds behind the first if you're third in the pack, and maintain a three-second cushion behind and to the right if you're fourth. This configuration keeps everyone close without riding in tandem or reducing following distances.

3. Keep the group together and look ahead for changes when you're the lead bike. Let your riding partners know ahead of time when you're going to switch lanes or make a turn, and begin the change early so everyone has plenty of time.

4. Place inexperienced riders behind the leader where they can be watched and instructed.

5. Allow the tailender to set the pace. Use your mirrors to keep an eye on the biker behind you, and remember, if he or she falls back, everyone should slow down to keep the group together.

6. Make sure everyone knows the route so riders who get separated from the main group won't have to hurry for fear of taking a wrong turn or getting lost.

7. Keep close ranks, but maintain a safe distance from each other. Bear in mind, a close group is easier to see, takes up less road space and is less likely to separate.

8. Assume a single file formation during turns and when entering or leaving a highway.


Tips:
Pass other vehicles one at a time when riding in a staggered formation. Pull out and pass when it's safe to do so if you're in the lead. Then take the left lane position and get way ahead to open a gap for the next rider. If you're next, watch for a safe chance to get into the new lane, pass the vehicle and open a gap for the motorcyclist behind you."

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PostPosted: Thu Apr 20, 2006 4:22 pm 
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2000cc Scooter Royalty

Joined: Tue Feb 07, 2006 4:45 pm
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Location: here, dammit
Thank you, Mr. Pittsfield. Good move.

Cheers,
Rob S.


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PostPosted: Fri Apr 28, 2006 1:44 am 
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2000cc Scooter Royalty

Joined: Tue Feb 07, 2006 4:45 pm
Posts: 2674
Location: here, dammit
from the truly excellent riding instructions at
http://www.elsham.pwp.blueyonder.co.uk/cx500/ridesafe/
He uses British diction.


Clear Road Signals

When riding in pairs or a group, it is often necessary to overtake as a queue, and then wait for the rider(s) behind. This is simplified if the rider who has just overtaken, and who can see more of the road ahead than anyone else, gives a Clear Road Signal. This is simply the left (clutch) arm raised fully above the head. This means "I can't see any hazards from where I am." He then maintains his line of sight to the rider who is next in the queue, and does not zoom off far ahead where the next rider can't see him.

The next rider to overtake, however, must himself make the decision to actually overtake.

The rider giving the signal should hold his arm up whilst the road is clear, but snap his arm down the instant he sees a hazard ahead. Given that all riders trust one another and ride to the same standards, the Clear Road Signal is a great help to those behind.

In a group situation, a clear road signal can be repeated "down the line" from No1 to No 2 to No 3.



Inter-rider Signals

We can't all afford helmet-to-helmet radios ... so ...

Bike at roadside with helmet against rear wheel means "I need assistance."

Rider ahead raising left (clutch) arm fully is the Clear Road Signal and means "I can see no hazards." The arm is rapidly withdrawn at the first sign of a hazard.

Index finger raised at arm length and rotated means "Start your engines."

Clenched fist raised to arm length and pumped up and down means "Stop your engines." This is more visible than a "throat-cutting" signal.

Thumb and forefinger joined in an "O" means "Are you ok?"

Thumb up means "Yes."

Thumb down means "No."

Palm down and hand rolled from side to side means "I am not sure."

Fist clenched means "I want to stop."

Exaggerated scratching of helmeted head means "Which way at the next junction?"

Hand extended rearwards, with fingertips alternately meeting and parting (like a flower opening and closing) means "You (or someone else behind) has left an Indicator running."



Bonus: He also notes these

Convoy Rules

> Agree a Ride Captain (leader) and Deputy. Everyone should have the opportunity to lead and deputise.

> Brief the riders in advance on the destination and route. Agree to stop at intervals to allow rests / refuelling / general checks / to change the running order. Give a general mobile phone contact number.

> The speed of the convoy is that of the slowest bike or rider in the convoy. If you have three GL1000s and a moped, your convoy speed is 30 mph.

> No overtaking within the convoy. If a rider breaks down, all riders behind should stop.

> Most experienced navigator at the front.

> Most experienced mechanic at the rear.

> On an organised long trip, riders will find it advantageous not to double up on the various tools carried. For example, nobody need bring a torque wrench if another rider has one.






In fact, read his whole page.
Gee. Useful, huh?





R/Rob S.


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PostPosted: Sun Apr 30, 2006 5:32 pm 
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Oh, here is a guide to graphical versions of the appropriate hand signals!

Image

http://www.ridemyown.com/articles/safet ... nals.shtml

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PostPosted: Thu Jul 06, 2006 6:07 am 
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Joined: Thu Jun 01, 2006 1:25 pm
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Location: Central Connecticut
Scooter Model(s): Suzuki Burgman
Here is a decent video on group riding.

Hi Res - 36 meg
http://www.msf-usa.org/downloads/MSF-GroupRide.wmv

Low Res - 20 meg
http://www.msf-usa.org/downloads/MSF-GroupRidelo-res.wmv


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PostPosted: Thu Jul 06, 2006 7:38 am 
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2000cc Scooter Royalty

Joined: Tue Feb 07, 2006 4:45 pm
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Location: here, dammit
Thanks!


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PostPosted: Thu Jul 06, 2006 5:27 pm 
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Location: RD HK BRKLYN
Scooter Model(s): Lambretta Jet200, Vespa Sprint Veloce
That was the worst group riding I've ever seen.



sorry, just kidding guy...that was an inside joke.
and while I'm on the topic...
I have vomit in my full face helmet.

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PostPosted: Thu Jul 06, 2006 6:31 pm 
H4N5 wrote:
I have vomit in my full face helmet.


Is it pink?


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 Post subject: HOW TO RIDE IN GROUPS
PostPosted: Sun Jul 16, 2006 11:35 am 
WE MAKE SURE WE HAVE A GOOD SESSION ON THE BEER FIRST!!
SO PISSED, VERY PISSED AND STONED!! HAHAHA :D :D :D


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PostPosted: Thu Jul 20, 2006 6:01 pm 
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Location: here, dammit
If you are not with the group, please stay away. Do not ride anywhere nearby.

If you are with the group, stay in formation.

The group riding brief must be held before each ride. Period. Strong-arming new riders into foregoing the brief because it doesn't seem 'cool' is putting them in an unfairly dangerous position.

The group's Leader has to decide before hand how to handle traffic controls (red lights, stops, blocking) and must then apply a consistent policy for that ride. If riders in the group are uncomfortable with that policy, then either the policy must change or those riders ought not go on that ride. There has to be the choice -- but we can't blow lights if no-one's blocking correctly and if we're moving as a single unit and not stopping, we can't have individuals doing otherwise.


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PostPosted: Fri Jun 13, 2008 8:11 pm 
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Joined: Tue Jun 03, 2008 4:39 pm
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Location: highland,ny
Scooter Model(s): strada 150 TE
Ditto im new also and am still learning things like this my freind has a harley and we went out yesterday .He showed me alot of stuff im reading here now but its good to know the info im getting is correct.

BTW it was pretty funny him at 270lbs on a big fat boy and me at 160 on my littel scooter,lol.We def got some looks.


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PostPosted: Tue Jul 06, 2010 4:07 pm 
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Location: Ronkonkoma NY
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Great thread. I've ridden with 1 other person ever, but am going to be riding in my first large group this weekend, great tips. :ubergeek:

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PostPosted: Sat Sep 04, 2010 6:00 am 
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@ ts ive been riding with a medium to large group of mix 2 weels from scooters to underbone and litter bikes(biggest was around 200+ motorcycles) one thing ive learned is that if your new in riding with a group, try to learn the basic hand signal and always follow the instruction given by the marshals...usually if they know that you new with this they designate someone experienced to guide you all the way


http://www.facebook.com/home.php?#!/pho ... =fbx_album" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

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PostPosted: Wed Sep 15, 2010 8:51 pm 
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Location: uws
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MAKING A LARGE GROUP RIDE SAFE AND SUCCESSFUL
http://my.sportbikeclub.com/_Making-a-L ... tId=160456

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=erpkyD7SMfw[/youtube]

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PostPosted: Tue Dec 14, 2010 3:24 pm 
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Quote:
TOURING TIP: MITIGATING THE RISKS OF GROUP RIDING
December 13th, 2010
http://www.roadrunner.travel/wp/2010/12 ... up-riding/

Riding in a group can be a great way to enjoy the camaraderie of traveling with other like-minded motorcyclists. Caravanning in a large, unbroken procession, however, poses special risks for the group. For example, you may have heard about the recent tragic accident in California where a group of twelve motorcycles collided with a car http://www.cnn.com/2010/US/11/14/califo ... index.html ). From published news reports, it appears that a frustrated motorist tried to pass the group of riders without adequate space for doing so. An oncoming car switched lanes, to avoid the passing motorist, only to crash head on into the motorcyclists. The result: five dead riders, and several more severely injured.

Although I personally prefer to ride in smaller groups, here are 10 suggestions for mitigating the risks of riding in larger groups:

1. Plan the Ride – Ride the Plan: A well-organized ride will include: a map of the route, or turn-by-turn directions, with designated fuel and lunch stops and phone numbers for contacting the ride leader and emergency services. At the pre-ride meeting, there should be a discussion of route conditions, riding formation, hand signals, rider skill levels, speed, and the assignment of riders within the group formation. It’s very important that everyone understands that they are expected to follow the ride plan unless an unforeseen event requires deviation, or the ride leader directs that a change be made.

2. Designate an Experienced Ride Leader: Although the ride leader may not have developed the ride plan, he or she is responsible for leading it and keeping everyone as safe as possible on the road. This includes setting an appropriate steady pace for the skill level of the group (i.e., an appropriate pace for the least skilled rider), having an in-depth knowledge of the planned route and stops, making sure proper formation is maintained, and curbing any inappropriate/unsafe riding behavior by group members.

3. Designate An Experienced Sweep Rider: The sweep rider is responsible for monitoring the group from the rear. He or she will assist with any bikes having mechanical problems, accidents or other issues. If the situation warrants it, the sweeper may need to call the lead rider and/or emergency services.

4. Arrive Ready to Ride: Each rider should meet at the beginning rally location with a full tank of gas, an empty bladder, a properly serviced motorcycle, appropriate riding apparel, a first aid kit, a tool kit, a cell phone and a positive attitude.

5. Break into Smaller Groups: On two-lane pavement it’s especially important to allow other motorists an opportunity to pass, by having breaks in the caravan of motorcycles. Four to six bikes in the smaller groups should be about right. It’s especially important to create passing gaps when a trailing vehicle indicates its intent to pass.

6. Ride Your Own Ride: It’s always paramount that riders stay within their skill level and comfort zone, even if that means dropping out of the group. If so, tell the sweep rider that you’re dropping back and will rejoin the group at the next scheduled stop. They probably won’t be more than a minute or two ahead. Less experienced riders should ride at the front of the group, where the speed is more consistent. That way, they won’t run into the temptation of playing catch-up with the group.

7. Use Established Hand Signals or Electronic Devices to Communicate: The Motorcycle Safety Foundation’s recommended hand signals can be found at: http://www.msf-usa.org/downloads/group_ride.pdf . Hand signals are generally initiated by the ride leader and passed along by each succeeding rider.

8. Be Courteous When Passing Other Motorists: Signal when changing lanes to pass another vehicle, don’t dart directly in front of the vehicle passed and be sure to maintain your pace after passing. When a motorist pulls over to let you go by, be sure to show appreciation by waving.

9. Don’t Become Fixated on the Bike in Front of You: There is often a tendency to focus on the motorcycle directly in front of you. Even if you’re maintaining a proper distance from that bike, you’re only looking a few seconds ahead of your front tire. It’s important to continue looking through curves and down the road for potential hazards.

10. Don’t’ Forget about the Bike Behind You: I was leading a group of about 20 bikes one time, when I glanced in my rear view mirror to discover, to my great surprise, that no one was back there. I reversed direction and found that a rider had low sided on gravel in the road. Every rider should periodically check his or her rear view mirrors to ensure that they can see the next bike in the group. If that bike isn’t visible, then slow down for them to catch up or reverse course to find out what happened. This will work its way up to the ride leader (as it did in my example) who also should turn around to investigate the problem.

I’m sure you can probably add to this list, based on your own experience, but the important thing is that riders reflect on these considerations before hosting or attending a large group ride.

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